Speech Language Therapy

kidscare-slide-3.jpgA Pediatric Speech Therapist specializes in the diagnosis, treatment and management of infants and children with a variety of congenital, neurological, developmental and acquired disorders. Treatment focuses on improving communication, speech and feeding skills.

A Pediatric Speech Therapist facilitates the development of a child’s communication, play, feeding and social skills. These skills include language acquisition, receptive & expressive language, articulation, phonological and apraxia fluency, auditory processing disorders, pragmatics, oral motor and feeding skills. Speech Therapists assist families in enhancing the development of their child through:
  • Using signs and pictures
  • Increasing sound production
  • Developing vocabulary
  • Developing social skills
  • Oral Motor exercises
  • Home programs
Although each child develops in his/her own way, children with the following issues could be considered as candidates for Speech Therapy:
  • Feeding Issues – difficulty with breast/bottle, transitioning between food groups, bottle to pureed foods, pureed foods to table)
  • Delayed Communication skills
  • Difficulty with early sound production
  • Difficulty understanding spoken language
  • Poor social skills
  • Poor oral motor skills
  • Difficulty with speech intelligibility

Speech Therapists


Age Specific Symptoms

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Feeds without loss of breast milk/formula out of side of mouth
  • Cries when hungry or uncomfortable
  • Establishes and maintains a consistent suck/swallow pattern
  • Cries in varying pitches or tones to indicate different needs

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Laughs in response to play
  • Establishes or maintains face to face communication during feeding
  • Vocalizes in response to sound stimulation
  • Attempts to interact with adults using eye contact or sounds
  • Demonstrates sound play

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Swallows early solids or transitions to spoon feeding
  • Uses gestures for “up” or “bye-bye”
  • Looks toward sounds or own name
  • Makes consonant or vowel sounds
  • Vocalizes to gain attention

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Responds to words/language appropriately
  • Understands simple questions
  • Babbles single consonants such as “ba” or “da”, or says “mama” or “dada”
  • Successfully eats finger foods, or bites on foods
  • Imitates sounds and/or words

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Eats a variety of flavors or textures of food
  • Follows 1-step directions in play
  • Identifies 3 body parts
  • Uses 8 to 10 words spontaneously
  • Imitates words spontaneously

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Retrieve familiar objects on request
  • Identifies 6 body parts on request
  • Uses 10 to 15 words spontaneously
  • Names 5 objects on request

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Accepts a number of foods or textures (“picky” eater)
  • Identifies familiar pictures when named
  • Understands the meaning of action words
  • Uses simple words frequently
  • Uses jargon with inflection

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Understands prepositional phrases
  • Uses action words
  • Uses 2-4 word sentences
  • Begins to ask questions
  • Speaks in complete sentences
  • Clearly articulates words
  • Imitates phrases or experiments with new words
  • Does experience frustration at not being understood

A Speech Evaluation may be considered if your child DOES NOT demonstrate the following:

  • Uses sentences to communicate
  • Produces correct beginning sounds of words
  • Responds to questions when asked
  • Has an expressive vocabulary of 200-1000 words